Education

It begins on a traditional Colombian farm, where coffee seeds are planted. Over 3 or 4 years, these seeds mature intro trees and produce fruits. Once ripe, the cherries are harvested and processed, depending on the desired aroma and flavor profile. This phase doesn’t always involve water usage (although this phase is known as wet milling. Discussed further in wet mill section) and the beans will end up as dry ‘parchment’. Not ready for roasting, the beans require dry milling before being shipped overseas – hulling, quality sorting and packing as green coffee.

Farming
Farming coffee is not an easy task. It requires a fully dedicated farming staff, intelligent agronomy, and constant monitoring at every stage. Indeed, passionate coffee farmers simply cannot take days off during the harvest season if they want to produce exceptional coffee.
As with any other crop, coffee’s process starts with a seed. In our producers’ farms, seedlings are first grown in a coffee tree nursery before being planted. These simple structures use mesh roofing to provide indirect sunlight and protection from the elements.
Then comes the next step: planting. Each variety requires a specific amount of space between plants so that they don’t compete with each other for the soil’s nutrients. However, they should also be planted in such a way as to take full advantage of every inch of fertile land.
Soil management is essential to coffee farming. Farmers must meet the basic needs of their plants so they thrive. Our producers work hard to provide their crops with all the necessary nutrients for a healthy life while constantly balancing their impact on the local environmental. Weeding is another important step that cannot be overlooked. Farmers cut the weeds to prevent them from robbing the coffee trees of nutrients.

The coffee plant is vulnerable to plagues, so pest control is a critical part of
maintaining healthy, productive trees. In order to make appropriate use of
crop protection products, our producers carefully analyze the altitude, climate, and soil conditions of their microclimates. They are always on the lookout for new farming techniques that naturally limit the pests and diseases they face. Once planted, it takes approximately 2 years for coffee trees to bear fruit.

Every coffee cherry requires handpicking due to the mountainous terrain. Only the best coffee beans reach your cup, since our team selects beans at peak ripeness – unripe and overripe beans disqualify the coffee from earning specialty status and add unpleasant notes.
Processing

Processing refers to the handling of coffee cherries and their beans. It is as
significant in altering the final coffee flavor as the frequently mentioned
roasting and brewing techniques. Below are the three main types of processing
procedures:

This procedure, also known as dry processing, is the most labor-intensive and time-consuming. After farmers pick the cherries, they are left to dry in the sun for up to 4 weeks. The green beans are then extracted from the parchment and pulp. This method usually yields a wine-like taste, since the bean ferments (within its pulp and skin) for much longer than other methods.

Natural
Honey
Becoming increasingly popular, since it combines the best of both natural and washed processes. The pulp is immediately removed from the bean, but the mucilage is left on the outside of the bean, giving the bean a very sticky, honey-like texture.  The final taste is usually more complex due to the effect of the organic acids.
This procedure, also known as dry processing, is the most labor- intensive and time-consuming. After farmers pick the cherries, they are left to dry in the sun for up to 4 weeks. The green beans are then extracted from the parchment and pulp. This method usually yields a wine-like taste, since the bean ferments (within its pulp and skin) for much longer than other methods.
Washed

In every process, drying occurs mechanically or in the sun. Once dried, the “parchment” beans are ready to go through the next phase: the dry mill.

The Dry Mill

Dry milling is the final stage in green coffee production, which involves removing the last layers of dry skin and sorting and preparing the beans for shipment. Firstly, it’s important to eliminate rocks and impurities before the beans can be threshed (removing the parchment skin). Afterwards, the coffee undergoes a three-stage sorting process to remove the defective and flawed beans, and to classify the healthy beans.

Size sorting

The beans are sifted through a series of metal screens with different sized holes. The selection size is determined by passing beans through screens until they cannot pass through the next, smaller size.

With the help of a machine comprised of a sloping, vibrating surface, the coffee is graded by density to determine the quality of each bean. The lighter, hollow beans move downwards, whilst the densest beans stay upwards.
Density sorting
Color sorting
An optical machine rapidly scans and inspects every bean. Beans that don’t fit the predefined shape and color profiles are rejected by a burst of compressed air.

Once the beans are quality sorted, the coffee is then prepared for export.

Exportation

The milled beans, now referred to as green coffee, are packed in 70kg bags and sent to a Colombian port. The National Federation of Coffee Growers of Colombia inspects the coffee to ensure it meets national standards for coffee quality. After, the coffee bags are placed in a shipping container and loaded aboard a ship.

Importation

Upon arrival to its US destination, the coffee is unloaded and passes through several inspections: US customs, the US Department of Agriculture, and finally, the Food and Drug Administration. After inspection, the coffee is approved to enter the country and is ready for transport to a client or warehouse.

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GREEN COFFEE

COLOMBIA